Monthly Archives: July 2016

How to Healthy in Winter for Your Skin

Dry winter air can wreak havoc on your skin — leaving it dry, itchy, and irritated; but there are many simple ways to combat dry skin causes and help keep your skin feeling moist and supple all winter long. Here are 10 ways to get started.

Top 10 Tips for Healthy Winter Skin

1. Invest in a humidifier. Using a humidifier in your home or office will add moisture to dry winter air and help keep your skin hydrated. Run a humidifier in the rooms you spend the most time in, including your bedroom.

2. Lower the thermostat. When it’s chilly outside, what’s the first thing you want to do? Crank up the heat! But central heat can make the air in your house even drier. Try setting the thermostat at a cool, yet comfortable setting — 68°F to 72°F — to maintain healthy skin.

3. Skip hot showers. Although it may be tempting to warm up with a long, steamy shower, hot water dries out your skin by stripping it of its natural oils. Instead, take a 5- to 10-minute lukewarm shower (or bath). You should also avoid using excessively hot water when washing your hands — if the water causes your skin to turn red, it’s too hot.

4. Choose cleanser wisely. The wrong soap can worsen itchy, dry skin. For instance, steer clear of regular bar soaps, since they tend to contain irritating ingredients and fragrances. Instead, start washing with a fragrance-free, moisturizing cleanser or gel. You can also prevent winter skin problems by using less soap, so limit your lathering to necessary areas, such as your hands, armpits, genitals, and feet.

5. Modify your facial skin care regimen for the season. During the winter months, choose cream-based cleansers, and apply toners and astringents sparingly, if at all. Many astringents contain alcohol, which can further dry your skin. Look for products that contain little or no alcohol — unless your skin is excessively oily. At night, use a richer moisturizer on your face.

Dry Winter Skin Care Tips

Winter brings cold, crisp days, fun seasonal activities, and snowy nights spent by a warm fire. But not all elements of winter are so enjoyable. For one, there’s dry winter skin, which can be exacerbated by the cold winter air outside and warm, dry air inside. This year, do your best to guard against the factors that cause dry, itchy skin.

Winter Itch Factors: How to Prevent Dry Winter Skin

Start by addressing the factors that irritate dry skin. Consider your indoor and outdoor environments, your skin care regimen, and even what you wear.

Low humidity. As temperatures fall, so do humidity levels, and the loss of moisture can cause your skin to become dry and itchy. Heat from furnaces, radiators, woodstoves, and fireplaces can also suck the moisture out of the air inside your home, which can dry out your skin even more. Put moisture back into the air by using a humidifier in the rooms you spend the most time in — both at home and in your office.

The loss of your skin’s natural oils. Washing your hands and showering frequently can actually strip your skin of its natural oils. One of the best ways to combat dry, itchy skin and keep your skin moist and supple is to moisturize it immediately after you wash your hands or take a shower. Moisturizers work by sealing moisture into your skin, so just pat your skin partially dry with a towel — don’t rub skin dry as this can remove your skin’s protective oils — and apply a moisturizing lotion or emollient to your damp skin.

Inferior moisturizers. Not all moisturizers are effective at alleviating winter itch. Water-based lotions and creams don’t lock in moisture as well as the oil-based ones. Thick, emollient moisturizers that come in ointment form typically contain the most oil, which makes them a smart choice for really dry skin. Petroleum jelly is a good example of this type of ointment-style moisturizer. Apply a small amount to your skin and be sure to rub it in well. If you prefer to use a moisturizing cream, look for one that contains petrolatum, mineral oil, or glycerin.

Chapped lips. Your lips are often the first to succumb to cold winter air. Find a lip moisturizer that you like and apply it often. Barbara R. Reed, MD, clinical professor of dermatology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, CO, and in private practice at Denver Skin Clinic, recommends an emollient-based moisturizer for the lips that is soothing and has no irritants. “I do not recommend products with menthol or phenol as they may be irritating.”

Itchy fabrics. What you wear may also contribute to your dry, itchy skin. “Some people have very sensitive skin that will itch with certain fabrics, especially rough ones like wool,” says Dr. Reed. Reed suggests that before you put on a potentially irritating piece of clothing you should gently rub the fabric against your cheek to see if it feels scratchy and causes your skin to itch. If it doesn’t cause a reaction, it’s probably a safe choice. Remember that an itchy wool blanket can irritate your skin, too. For a more restful sleep, you can use a top sheet as a barrier, encase the blanket in a cotton or cotton flannel duvet cover, or switch to a cotton comforter.

Gray Hair Care Tips Fir Colouring

The roots of gray hair may lie in a particular type of communication between hair follicles and melanocyte stem cells, the cells that make and store the pigments in skin and hair, a new study suggests.

Using mouse models, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center found that Wnt signaling, already known to control many biological processes, may explain how these stem cells work together to produce hair color and generate hair growth.

“We have known for decades that hair follicle stem cells and pigment-producing melanocycte cells collaborate to produce colored hair, but the underlying reasons were unknown,” said Mayumi Ito, assistant professor of dermatology at NYU Langone in a news release from NYU. “We discovered Wnt signaling is essential for coordinated actions of these two stem cell lineages and critical for hair pigmentation.”

Researchers found the lack of Wnt activation in melanocyte stem cells leads to de-pigmented, or gray hair. They also showed that abnormal Wnt signaling in hair follicle stem cells prevents hair re-growth. The study’s authors concluded their findings could serve as a model for tissue regeneration.

“The human body has many types of stem cells that have the potential to regenerate other organs,” noted Ito. “The methods behind communication between stem cells of hair and color during hair replacement may give us important clues to regenerate complex organs containing many different types of cells.”

The researchers added the study, published in the June 11 issue of Cell, could help shed light on diseases in which melanocytes are either lost or grow uncontrollably as in melanoma.